Energy Mentor Network Spotlight: Mark Patterson

The Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council is continuing its series of feature stories highlighting the mentors behind the Energy Mentor Network program offering industry specific expertise.

The Energy Mentor Network‘s goal is to foster the growth of Tennessee advanced energy technologies and startups by connecting entrepreneurs with mentors. This gives Tennessee yet another advantage in grabbing its more than fair share of the $1.3 trillion global advanced energy market.

The Energy Mentor Network is run by the Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council in partnership with Launch Tennessee.

In broad strokes, the Energy Mentor Network pairs mentors with promising new companies and entrepreneurs through a structured program involving panel presentations and mentoring sessions.

The purpose of the program is to develop quality startups. After completing the program, startups will have an investable pitch deck, a rock solid business model and a plan to establish more traction. These tools will position Tennessee’s entrepreneurs to raise capital, request other funds like SBIR grants, and scale their company.

TAEBC is highlighting this week Mark Patterson of Patterson Intellectual Property Law. Mark has 35 years of experience counseling clients in the protection, management, and enforcement of intellectual property rights, including patent and trademark prosecution and licensing. As a former electronics design engineer, Mark works regularly with complex electronic, computer, and electro-mechanical technologies.

He manages patent and trademark portfolios for clients with significant domestic and global operations. Mark began his legal career as a litigator and for 30 years tried numerous cases and argued appeals in both state and federal courts. He was an adjunct professor at Vanderbilt Law School and has provided expert witness services in a variety of intellectual property disputes.  He applies all of this experience in providing cost-effective, strategic IP advice to businesses throughout the U.S.

TAEBC is continuing to accept mentors for the Energy Mentor Program. If you are interested in this opportunity, please visit the “For Mentors” section of the Energy Mentor Network portion of TAEBC’s website.

Energy Mentor Network Spotlight: Jim Phillips

The Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council is continuing its series of feature stories highlighting the mentors behind the Energy Mentor Network program offering industry specific expertise.

The Energy Mentor Network‘s goal is to foster the growth of Tennessee advanced energy technologies and startups by connecting entrepreneurs with mentors. This gives Tennessee yet another advantage in grabbing its more than fair share of the $1.3 trillion global advanced energy market.

The Energy Mentor Network is run by the Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council in partnership with Launch Tennessee.

In broad strokes, the Energy Mentor Network pairs mentors with promising new companies and entrepreneurs through a structured program involving panel presentations and mentoring sessions.

The purpose of the program is to develop quality startups. After completing the program, startups will have an investable pitch deck, a rock solid business model and a plan to establish more traction. These tools will position Tennessee’s entrepreneurs to raise capital, request other funds like SBIR grants, and scale their company.

TAEBC is highlighting this week Jim Phillips. He serves as the CEO of XMI. Jim has supported entrepreneurial companies over a 26 year career. Today, XMI provides a comprehensive platform of infrastructure and the back office serves to over 140 businesses and organizations designed to ensure each leadership team can focus on revenue development and its competitive advantages.

TAEBC is continuing to accept mentors for the Energy Mentor Program. If you are interested in this opportunity, please visit the “For Mentors” section of the Energy Mentor Network portion of TAEBC’s website.

Nashville reaping benefits of LED adoption

Cities like Nashville, Tennessee are leading the charge and reaping the benefits when it comes to LED adoption, according to a news release from GE Lighting.

GE Lighting rated the top 10 cities whose citizens have a greater percentage of purchasing LEDs for their home, and Music City came in at #9. In top cities, one-third of residents have purchased at least one LED over the last year.

The following cities are leaders in LED adoption, saving energy at home.

  1. Seattle, WA (35.5%)
  2. Minneapolis, MN (32.9%)
  3. Oklahoma City/Tulsa, OK (32.3%)
  4. St. Louis, MO (32.2%)
  5. Richmond, VA (30.5%)
  6. Orlando, FL (30.1%)
  7. Hartford/New Haven, CT (30%)
  8. Milwaukee, WI (29.3%)
  9. Nashville, TN (29.2%)
  10. Phoenix, AZ (28.8%)

As LEDs are making lighting technology more energy efficient, the national and global energy sector is rapidly changing. These changes are rippling through all sectors of the economy in increasing visible ways.

LEDs are a prime example of the economic development happening within Tennessee’s advanced energy sector.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is on the forefront of lighting innovation. The discovery of a process to produce high thermal conductivity graphite foam has led to Senior Research Staff Member James Klett‘s research focusing on thermal management materials in applications from personal computers to automobiles to military platforms. James has worked with several companies with the graphite foam to commercialize several applications ranging from satellite radiators to LED lighting.

Energy Mentor Network Spotlight: Bob Hilton

The Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council is continuing its series of feature stories highlighting the mentors behind the Energy Mentor Network program offering industry specific expertise.

The Energy Mentor Network‘s goal is to foster the growth of Tennessee advanced energy technologies and startups by connecting entrepreneurs with mentors. This gives Tennessee yet another advantage in grabbing its more than fair share of the $1.3 trillion global advanced energy market.

The Energy Mentor Network is run by the Tennessee Advanced Energy Business Council in partnership with Launch Tennessee.

In broad strokes, the Energy Mentor Network pairs mentors with promising new companies and entrepreneurs through a structured program involving panel presentations and mentoring sessions.

The purpose of the program is to develop quality startups. After completing the program, startups will have an investable pitch deck, a rock solid business model and a plan to establish more traction. These tools will position Tennessee’s entrepreneurs to raise capital, request other funds like SBIR grants, and scale their company.

bob hiltonThis week TAEBC is recognizing Bob Hilton. Hilton is the president of Robert Hilton Energy. He recently retired from Alstom and GE after 20 years. Hilton has extensive expertise in power generation and environmental compliance specifically government affairs, policy and technology. His experience includes many years of global general management as well as selling capital goods and services to the power industry and other major industries such as iron, steel and chemicals.

His primary interests have always been creating and building new businesses for the companies he worked for, providing strategic direction and growth opportunities, technical sales and product development.

Do you want to be a mentor like Bob Hilton? TAEBC is still accepting applications for mentors in the program. If you are interested, please visit the “For Mentors” section of the Energy Mentor Network portion of TAEBC’s website.

Energy efficiency jobs: Where does Tennessee stand?

New findings of a national energy efficiency report reveal energy efficiency is the largest sector within the U.S. clean energy economy.

According to the report, this sector accounts for three in four of its jobs and employs nearly 1.9 million people nationwide.

The document, entitled “Energy Efficiency Jobs in America,” was released by Environmental Entrepreneurs (E2), E4TheFuture, and BW Research Partnership.

The energy efficiency industry helps customers squeeze more productivity and comfort out of the same amount – or less – energy. Its workers install smart lighting, for example, or seal duct leaks in HVAC systems or insulate walls and ceilings. They also make climate control systems run better or manufacture state-of-the-art appliances.

In short, they figure out how to help homes and businesses run leaner by lowering utility bills.

For the Volunteer State, the report says about 27,500 Tennesseans work in energy efficiency related jobs. The majority of employment is focused on traditional HVAC and renewable and efficiency heating and cooling technologies.

There are also a few thousand workers who support Energy Star appliances, efficient lighting, and advanced material and insulation.

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Most firms are either primarily focused on installation or trade. Installation firms account for 45 percent of establishments and trade firms account for a third. 59 percent of these businesses are small, with fewer than 11 permanent employees each.

But Tennessee has representation across medium to large-sized establishments as well. Just over a quarter (27 percent) report 11 to 99 permanent workers, and nine percent note 100 workers or more. 63 percent of firms derive the majority of revenue from this work, with 37 percent noting all of their revenue is attributable to energy efficiency services.

Tennessee ranked 25th in the nation in the 2016 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard, moving up six places since the 2015 ranking. The state scored very low in the utilities category because both investments and therefore energy savings are lower than the national average (ACEEE).

When it comes to a county-by-county basis, the following counties had the highest recorded energy efficiency employment.

  1. Shelby county 5,650
  2. Davidson county 5,449
  3. Knox county 3,689
  4. Williamson county 1,768
  5. Rutherford county 1,342
  6. Hamilton county 835
  7. Sumner county 788
  8. Wilson county 715
  9. Blount county 635
  10. Anderson county 627

The following is a graph for Metropolitan Statistical Areas. (MSAs)

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Here is a graph comparing energy efficiency employment to the corresponding congressional districts in numerical order.

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